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Science

When Fish Eat Birds

From northern pike to catfish, it has been proven that some species of fish do prey on birds. In this article by Matthew Miller, watch amazing footage and learn more about why and when fish target bird species. What was once the myths of anglers is now proven fact, says Miller, “Thanks to YouTube, David Attenborough and actual research, we now know that...

Giant Water Bugs Found to be Fearless Predators

According to new research published in the journal Entomological Science, Giant Water Bugs have been found to be fearless predators, taking down everything from ducklings to venomous snakes. “As scary as water bugs sound,” writes Joshua Rapp Learn, “their status as top-shelf predators means they are key to maintaining a healthy ecosystem.” Via...

Fish Slime Helps in Next Generation Antibiotic Research

The next generation of antibiotics may be developed from research based on slimy mucus coating on fish skin. “The slimy mucus that coats fishes acts as a protective coating,” explains Sandra Loesgen. “Researchers speculate that there is also a chemical component produced by the fish’s microbiome that helps ward off infection.” Research being done...

How Light Pollution Affects Aquatic Insects

We’ve all heard about light pollution, but rarely talked about is how it affects aquatic insects. “Here’s where light comes into play,” explains Liz Perkin. “Drifting puts aquatic insects at risk of being eaten by visually oriented predators like trout, which will consume any objects they can see floating in the water. In order to decrease this...

Broad Impacts of Lake Trout in Yellowstone

The introduction of nonnative lake trout into Yellowstone Lake has affected more than the native cutthroat trout populations. “Zooplankton, cutthroat trout, river otters, osprey, bald eagles, bears and likely elk are among the creatures whose numbers, diet and behavior have been altered as a result of the presence of the invasive fish,” concludes new...

New Research Suggests Humans Sense Magnetic Fields

Many animals and fish, including salmon and trout, may rely on magnetic sensitivity to find migration routes. “This magnetic sensitivity, called magnetoreception, has always been a superpower only nonhuman animals seem to have, that we can only envy,” writes Justin Housman. “But new research from Caltech suggests maybe we’ve had magnetic sensitivity...

How Fish Gills Work

Gills allow fish to absorb oxygen from the water and use it for energy, and in this way are similar to the function of lungs in humans and other mammals. "The main difference is how they are able to absorb much smaller concentrations of available oxygen, while allowing the fish to maintain an appropriate level of Sodium Chloride (salt) in their...

How Shortfin Mako Sharks Swim So Fast

Shortfin mako sharks are capable of swimming at estimated speeds of 70 or 80 miles per hour. New research investigates how they achieve that impressive speed. The research findings will be described at the upcoming 2019 American Physical Society in Boston, Mass. “The work, which was funded in part by Boeing and the U.S. Army, could lead to new designs to...

New Data on Dragonfly Migration

"Each spring and fall, large dragonflies called green darners fly across North America. A green darner can travel as far as 900 miles on its two-inch wings, fluttering from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. They are some of the most abundant dragonflies on the continent — but few people notice this mass migration." Washington Post reporter Ben Guarino covers...

Autumn Migrations

Two great migrations happen every autumn in Nova Scotia: “The first consists of hundreds of Atlantic salmon, returning to their natal river to spawn after a year, or sometimes longer, spent in the ocean. […] The other is made up of legions of anglers from all over the world who flock to the Margaree in the hopes of connecting with one of those Atlantic...