{"pos":"top","cat":"science","type":"topic"}


Science

Billionaires in the West

In this intriguing interview with Yale sociologist and author Justin Farrell, we're treated to an upfront view of a problem plaguing the American West. The problem, as Farrell discusses with journalist Carl Segerstrom of High Country News, is that the influx of billionaires in recent years to western states such as Wyoming has created such an income...

New Efforts Underway to Save Salmon, Steelhead

The four dams on the Lower Snake River have long been a hotly-contested issue between conservationists and the agriculture industry. For at least 30 years, the two sides have bickered over how to best preserve and replenish the rapidly-declining salmon and steelhead populations in the Columbia River Basin. A recent episode of Morning Edition from NPR...

Hex Mayfly Hatches Decreasing by 84 Percent

The hex mayfly hatches of the Midwest are common knowledge, even out here in the Rockies where I live. Fishing buddies of mine from the Midwest have always shared the stories of these hatches, and it's been on my bucket list to fish one throughout the night. However, I might not get the chance to do that. According to a recent piece by Chad Shmukler...

Fish Facts: Lahontan Cutthroat

The Lahontan cutthroat trout captures the imagination of anglers everywhere, for two reasons. The first being that it's just incredible the fish even exists today (it's a true conservation miracle) and the second, of course, being that these things grow pretty damn big. Thankfully, you can get your Lahontan fix without the trip to Pyramid Lake in a recent...

Research: Cichlids Produce New Species

Recent research has found that cichlids, a colorful fish typically found in the freshwater lakes of Africa, have the ability to produce entirely new species when it mates. “According to a new 10-year study on two African freshwater lakes published in Nature Communications, the females accidentally could introduce new genes into their population.” Read...

Solving the Riddle of the Brown Trout

The debate over whether brown trout (Salmo trutta) constitute a single species or several may soon be resolved, following the completion of the brown trout reference genome. “The brown trout reference genome will enable scientists to sample and decode DNA from different populations and compare to the whole genome sequence, providing the data required to...

Do Salmon Make Decisions as a Group?

“A series of new studies suggests migrating salmon work together to find their way home—and get lost when there aren’t enough of them to make a decision.” Read more about the research findings in this article from Nancy Averett via Hakai Magazine.

Salmon Notebooks Reveal Past Bounty

For more than 3 decades, from 1912 to 1948, a government “fisheries overseer” named Robert Gibson and his colleagues filled dozens of notebooks with fish scales from the Skeena River. Now, scientists have used the DNA preserved in those scales to study changes in the fishery. “The conclusion is sobering: Declines have been more precipitous and...

Oldest Freshwater Fish Found

New age-dating techniques have revealed that one studied bigmouth buffalo fish lived to be around 112 years old. That's older than the species' previous estimated life expectancy of 26 years, and is the oldest known freshwater fish of any kind. The finding opened new avenues of question for conservation issues for the species as well. "The bigmouth buffalo...

Zombie Cicadas

Cicadas can be a popular fly pattern this time of year, and new research shines light on the interesting insects, examining a hallucinogenic fungus that causes them to operate in a zombie-like state. “We anticipate these discoveries will foster a renewed interest in early diverging fungi and their pharmacologically important secondary metabolites, which...