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Experts

Ask the Expert: Dry Fly Fishing on Lakes

Question: I fish for trout sometimes in lakes by trolling with a sinking line. When fly fishers talk about lakes it’s always about trolling or fishing a chironomid down deep with a strike indicator—is there ever any dry fly fishing for trout in lakes? - Irene L. Answer: Yes, Irene, there absolutely is dry-fly fishing on trout lakes. On the whole, I...

How to Fish High Mountain Creek Pools

Question: I fly fish steep-gradient creeks in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, in California. Many of these streams are not fishable except in the pools averaging four to seven feet deep. What is the best method to fish this type of water? And would one fish nymphs or streamers in such pools? —Dave B Answer: Best method? I’ll get to that. Let’s start with...

Flies New and Old and Others In Between

Question: It seems between print and online magazines, vendor sites, fishing blogs, and YouTube there are new trout flies coming out all the time—but do I really need to be always adding new patterns? — Walt B Answer: Yes, of course you do, Walt. Since the first fly was tied and named, trout have been continuously and rapidly evolving. Today’s brown...

Getting Soft Hackled

Just about every trout stream on the planet has massive caddis hatches on summer evenings, and it’s great to see fish rising as the sun falls. Yet, catching those rising fish is often kind of tough. For years, I would wait for rising trout — and then tie on a good dry fly, such as an X-Caddis or an Elk Hair Caddis. Those great flies often floated...

"Getting Your Expert On" - The School of Trout

There are two main categories of trout fishermen. First, there are the anglers who enjoy spending time on the water in the company of family and friends, and who fish well enough to catch the occasional trout on a fly. When these folks have the financial wherewithal to hire a guide, they’re happy to follow that guide’s instructions to the letter. It’s...

"An Emerger By Any Other Name"

Question: “Looking at my assortment of flies collected through the years, I cannot tell which are emergers and which are dry flies. Is there a way to tell the difference?” —Matt J Answer: Funny you should ask, Matt, I mean that you should ask now—I’m just finishing up a new class on fishing emergers (and soft-hackles and wet flies) for a...

Freshwater Vs. Saltwater Fly Fishing

Have a question you want answered? Email it to us at [email protected] Question: "What are the differences between freshwater fly fishing and saltwater fly fishing? Do you fly fish with different rods and reels and other equipment when you fish for saltwater fish and freshwater fish?" via email Many fly anglers fish in both fresh and salt water. After...

Smaller and Quieter Can Be Better, Part II: No Hatch

As often as tiny flies are right for matching hatches, they can be right just for fooling trout when no hatches are underway. Let’s say you can see a trout holding down close to the pale cobble bottom in a clear river. You work a big Woolly Bugger ever deeper until at last it swims up to the trout’s mouth. The fish darts to the side to avoid the fly...

Top-Water Retrieves for Smallies

Question: What is the best way to work a popper in rivers? Most of my experience fishing for smallmouth bass is in lakes. How is it different? —Byron H Good one, Byron! The answer to your question will put a lot more smallies onto MIDCURRENT readers’ poppers and hair bugs. Regarding how to work a bass popper, there’s a load of confusion out there; I...

Lakes: Learning to Read Again

Question: I am so used to fishing for trout in rivers and streams, and I’ve figured out where they hide. . . but I am perplexed when it comes to finding trout in Lakes. How do I find trout hidden in a body of lake water, when everywhere I look, it all looks the same? Help! —Christine P Answer: Help, Christine, is here. I’ve fished a heap of trout...