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Dealing With Wind

by Philip Monahan

Have a question you want answered? Email it to us at ask@midcurrent.com.

Question: I’m heading to Alaska to fish for silvers, and I’ve been warned that it’s almost always windy on the rivers we’ll be fishing. Can you offer some tips for casting into the wind?

via email

Answer: I spent a summer guiding on the Copper River, which drains into Lake Iliamna, where wind was a constant problem, so I spent a lot of time helping clients deal with big gusts. In my view, there are three approaches: 1. beating the wind, 2. working to lessen its effects, and 3. giving in to it.

Fly Casting in Windphoto by sopheia

The two ways to beat the wind (i.e. cast directly into it or across it) are to increase your line speed and to keep your line low, closer to the water. The only effective method for increasing your line speed is to double-haul. I know, I know: if you don’t already know how to do this, it sounds difficult. It’s really not. Find someone who is a good caster, and have him or her teach you. It’s a lot easier to learn from a person than from a book or magazine article. To keep your line low, either cast sidearm (which limits distance) or crouch during the cast. Wind is usually less intense close to the ground or water, so you can sometimes cast “under” it. More comfortable than crouching is casting from your knees, if it’s possible.

To lessen the effects of the wind, you can use flies with smaller or slimmer profiles, a sinking tip line (which will offer more momentum in the air to cut through the wind), and adjust your casting motion to keep from whacking yourself with your own fly. Wind blowing directly into your casting arm is the most dangerous because the wind will blow the fly toward your body on every front- and backcast. There are two good ways to keep from hooking yourself or being knocked out by splitshot.

  1. First, you can simply turn around, facing away from your target, and deliver the fly on the backcast. This takes a little practice, and you have to be quite diligent about coming to a full stop on the presentation backcast, to ensure that the line rolls out fully.
  2. Second, you can angle your rod so that the tip actually travels on your downwind side. Most folks try to do this by angling the rod across their chest, but this robs you of a lot of power. Instead, lift your elbow, and angle the rodover your head. So, if you’re right-handed, you cast normally with your right hand, but the rod tip is on your left side. You’ll find that it’s quite easy to cast for distance with this method, and now your flies will be blown away from you by the wind.

Finally, if the wind is just too strong for the above methods, just go with it. Find a position where you can cast directly downwind. In a really strong wind, you won’t even have to worry about getting a good backcast. Just angle your forward cast upward and let the wind deliver the fly. You can also use the river current to deliver the fly to a good lie. If you can’t cast to a spot, find a place where you can get your fly into the river at a point where it will drift down to the intended target.

MidCurrent Fly Fishing
 
Phil Monahan is a former Alaskan guide and was the long-time editor of American Angler magazine. He's now a columnist for MidCurrent and writes and edits the fly-fishing blog at OrvisNews.com.
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  • http://www.montanaflyfishingguides.com Montana Fly Fishing Guides

    As a guide in Livingston, Montana we often deal with windy days on the river.  Angler’s that have good single or double haul techniques don’t struggle too much however less advanced casters can have a difficult time.  Phil has some good points.  I would also add that many drift boat anglers should stay seated so they can get closer to the fish and reduce their profile in the wind.

  • Nicolasbotting

    Fly selection is also very important, avoid flies that don´t cut the wind. Also avoid spiltshots, strike indicators, trailes or droppers, they make casting cumbersome and usually end up in knots. Just one fly maybe even on a shorter than usual and thicker leader and a lot of patience.