Utah’s Fight for Public Stream Access

Stream access issues in Utah have escalated over the past year, but the Utah Stream Access Coalition has continued the fight for anglers and have now teamed with organizations and companies such as AFFTA, Patagonia and Hatch Outdoors to offer a Matching Funds Campaign, increasing resources to fight for public river access.

Read more in the press release below.

USAC Fighting for Public Stream Access in Utah

From USAC:

USAC (Utah Stream Access Coalition) is fighting for public stream access in Utah on two fronts! To take on the opposition, we have teamed up with AFFTA, Patagonia and Hatch Outdoors to offer a Matching Funds Campaign for desperately needed resources. Our attorneys are working pro-bono, but there are still many supplementary costs to be covered. Showing their continued dedication to the interest of anglers everywhere, AFFTA has stepped to the plate again to offer $2,500. USAC needs to raise that same amount in order to receive the funds. Since a USAC donation is not tax deductible, we are offering supporters amazing GEAR GIFTS from Patagonia and Hatch Outdoors that are perfect for any river warrior. The case in Utah represents a slippery slope for angling access in all states. Please show your support for public access to rivers by donating today!

PATAGONIA BOOTS and HATCH OUTDOORS
USAC is proud to present a joint effort fundraiser campaign

  • $250.00 Donation you receive a pair of Patagonia Rock Grip Boots
  • $300.00 Donation you receive a pair of Patagonia Rock Grip Bar Boots
  • $600.00 Donation you receive a Hatch 5-Plus Premium Fly Fishing Reel

How to Participate
Contact promo@utahstreamaccess.org using the heading AFFTA MATCHING FUNDS 2013.
Matching Fund Requirements

  • Matching funds AFFTA with support from Patagonia and Hatch
  • Need to be AFFTA member for this to count! Not a member? No problem
  • Sign up here
  • GIFT for Donation

ONLY TWO WEEKS TO DONATE
Feb. 1-15 2013
Get the full details here

USAC’s work is undertaken by a team of dedicated volunteers and 100% of funds are used to fight for stream access. USAC is not a store and is not selling products. We thank you for your continued ongoing support!

Sincerely,
Utah Stream Access Coalition
Working to restore public access to, and use of, Utah’s public waters and waterways.

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  • Terry Gunn

    I’m an angler and the Sevier River in southern Utah is my back yard. I own about 500 yards of this spectacular stream. The people who are fighting for public stream access are seeking to totally abandon private property rights.

    Now, if the people of the state of Utah wanted to change the law and allow anyone to climb over their wall or fence and walk around in their back yard, that would be different.
    However, for a person to lose their right to private property, just because
    there is a stream flowing though it, is contrary to the principals that this
    country was founded upon.

    You are welcome to come ask me to fish my property, if you agree to leave it as you found it I’ll likely give you my permission to fish the river. However, no person should have the legal right to unfettered access on my, or others, private property, just because there is a stream flowing through it.

    If this law is overturned, I’ll be getting me a pet bison…a big bull, and he’ll be my river-keeper.

    Terry and Wendy Gunn

    • http://www.facebook.com/thomaswarrenlarsen Thomas Larsen

      I could be wrong, but I’m not sure if you understand what USAC is trying to accomplish with their compromise of HB68. The compromise would allow limited public access to streams that run through private property, but only navigable waterways. It’s based on the laws in Idaho that have worked for over 35 years. The rule is based on the idea that these navigable waterways can be used for transportion and there for the public should have access to them. Of course they must enter and exit the water are proper PUBLIC access points. The navigable waterways can be determined as those capable of floating a 6-foot log at high water. If the long won’t float there is no access allowed. The issue of public acess for anglers, boaters, or other recreational activities plagued Utah for as long as I can remember. It’s time for it to end.

    • itmakessensetome

      You are obviously one ill informed property owner. This is the misinformation Rep. Kay McIff was selling in Sevier county in order to pass the law. The Utah Stream Access
      Coalition has never, ever, not even once, condone trespass or advocated climbing
      fences to get to rivers. Not once! Not ever! Before you go stirring up a bunch
      of false truths, you should know who you are talking about and what you are
      talking about. The only way the USAC has ever said they want to gain access to
      a stream or river is via a public easement such as a bridge, which a county, or
      city, or state has already entitled the public’s use of. An angler may enter
      and exit only via these public access points. That is how it is supposed to
      work. No broken fence, no one on your property, no one messing with you pretty
      lil’ bison. Get Informed!