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How to Tie a Deadpool Midge

Producer: Tim Flagler  |  Tightline Productions

Tier and videographer Tim Flagler: “The Deadpool Midge incorporates many of my favorite midge larva building materials into one super-tasty little package. And like the character it’s named for, it’s adorned in red and black and is pretty much indestructible.”

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  • Fred Rickson

    Gee, I know about 50 folks who have called this one a red and black for maybe 25 years. You just have to get out to the left coast more often. Best as always.

    • Tightline

      If I had called this fly the Red and Black I would have never heard the end of it. “It doesn’t transition from red in the abdomen to black in the thorax.” Or maybe “Since when did the Red and Black grow a fur collar?” Or better still “how can you tie a Red and Black without using red stretch tubing? Sacrilege!” Different materials, different structure, different color profile- different fly.

      • Fred Rickson

        And, Deadpool says it all, for everyone…sort of like the purple Adams goofy personal new name, awhile back, that said nothing to anyone. Best as always.

        • Tightline

          I believe you are talking about Andy Carlson’s “Purple Haze.” And, once again Fred, thanks you so much for valuable input. It’s always a learning experience for me.

          • Fred Rickson

            Todays naming of flies reminds me of the naming of species. For centuries, the genus gave a context of where the new organism belonged among its closest relatives (all within the same genus name), while the species name said something specific about location, color, wing length, etc. Today, the species name is often meaningless being named after Bob Dylan, your cat’s favorite toy, or your car model. But, I did just get to name 10 new flies because I did use 10 colors of thread while tying 10 otherwise identical Pheasant Tails (the heads are all of a different color). Best, and I still enjoy your clear, concise, and well-done videos

  • Ken Woodward

    Nice fly! I’m always amazed at how small are the chironomids you use down there. Up here in BC an 18 is considered tiny, and we regularly use sz 10 2XL chironomid pupae – in lakes, of course. 🙂 Have you tried coating the abdomen with Brush-On Super Glue? I coat all of my chironomid pupae – the ones tied with fragile materials, at least – with it and the flies last much, much longer; they’re shredded after the first fish or two otherwise.

    • Tightline

      I have coated the bodies on this particular pattern with UV cure resin in larger sizes like 18s and 20s and it looked really nice and I am sure helps with durability. With smaller sizes, like this 22 and also 24s I like to keep the bodies as slim as possible so leave them uncoated. In other words, I’m willing to give up a little in terms of durability in favor of a slim profile. And yes, I really wish our chironomids were as large as yours! Thanks for the comment.

      • Ken Woodward

        You should give fresh Brush-On Super Glue a try. As long as it is nice and thin, like it is when first opened, it will not add noticeable bulk to the pattern, and it’ll make it bulletproof. And, yes, we love our “bombers”!