Techniques and Gear for Photographing Flies

Neal Osborn offers a rich resource for fly tiers who want to do take better photographs of their flies — and for photographers who might wish they could tie better. His FlyArtStudio.com was first noticed by Cameron Mortenson of the Fiberglass Manifesto blog: “Check out Neal’s Valentine Edition of Art-Fly which is a monthly slide show giving you a glimpse into the photography techniques Neal is experimenting with and flies he has been tying. I am impressed.” Also be sure to check out Osborn’s Photography articles, which offer interesting guidance on macro photography techniques.

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  • RICH

    THANKS FOR THE INTRO TO NEAL’S TALENTS. VERY TASTEFULLY DONE. IF ONLY ONE COULD PRESENT A FLY AS BEAUTIFULLY IN THE WATER ..

  • Fred Rickson

    Sorry to throw water on this project, but I think the flies would have been much more enjoyable if a full depth of focus had been used. This out-of-focus “coolness” came to the food industry about ten years ago, and now we find a plate of spaghetti with just the center strand in focus and everything in front and behind is out of focus. Part of my career was publishing macro photos, and there are three common reasons for an out of focus effort. These are; photographer’s choice, a lens which does not close down enough to provide a complete dept of field, or inadequate lighting which precludes stopping down the lens enough.
    The front view of the Gallop streamers are a good example of out of focus photography. Aesthetically, my choice would be a completely in-focus fly (maybe four inches of depth) with all the little delicate feathers parts viewable. But that is just my preference. Getting that four inch fly (rather than just the hook eye and a few deer hairs), shot from the front, totally in focus is a tough assignment. It would take really good equipment (maybe f32 wouldn’t even do it).
    Fred Rickson